FranzRev


Contemporary text and music of la Marseillaise

Contemporary text and music of la Marseillaise

(Quelle: bunniesandbeheadings)


On 21 September 1792 the National Convention decreed the abolition of royalty. The text of the decree itself simply reads: “The National Convention unanimously decrees that royalty is abolished in France.” 
The decree was signed by Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve (1756-1794), President of the Convention, Jean-Pierre Brissot de Varville (1754-1793) and Mark Alba Lasource David (1763-1793). The left margin of the document reads the annotation, ”By virtue of the Decree of 10 August 1792 on 22 September 1792, the year I of the French Republic on behalf of the nation,” and this is signed by Gaspard Monge (1746-1818) and Georges Danton (1759-1794), members of the Interim Executive Board, recalling the suspension of the king. 
[Source]

On 21 September 1792 the National Convention decreed the abolition of royalty. The text of the decree itself simply reads: “The National Convention unanimously decrees that royalty is abolished in France.” 

The decree was signed by Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve (1756-1794), President of the Convention, Jean-Pierre Brissot de Varville (1754-1793) and Mark Alba Lasource David (1763-1793). The left margin of the document reads the annotation, ”By virtue of the Decree of 10 August 1792 on 22 September 1792, the year I of the French Republic on behalf of the nation,” and this is signed by Gaspard Monge (1746-1818) and Georges Danton (1759-1794), members of the Interim Executive Board, recalling the suspension of the king. 

[Source]

(Quelle: bunniesandbeheadings)

n-nevskaya-n:

Beautiful lady she was.

n-nevskaya-n:

Beautiful lady she was.

(via montagnarde1793)


French Revolution trading card depicting Danton, a “chief of the Revolution” who was a “grand orator” guillotined by the “order of Robespierre.” 

French Revolution trading card depicting Danton, a “chief of the Revolution” who was a “grand orator” guillotined by the “order of Robespierre.” 

(Quelle: delcampe.fr, via bunniesandbeheadings)

“Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”
— Voltaire (via jesylovely)
Certains médailles - bicentenaire de la révolution Française.

(Quelle: ebay.fr, via trahisonprisonetguillotine)

“What is the Third Estate? Everything. What has it been up to now in the political order? Nothing. What does it demand? To become something.”
— Abbe Sieyes (via aiviloharas)
vivelareine:

The October 6 march on Versailles, illustrated by Rolf Rettich for ‘Maria Theresa: One Heart and Many Crowns.’
[source: my scan]

vivelareine:

The October 6 march on Versailles, illustrated by Rolf Rettich for ‘Maria Theresa: One Heart and Many Crowns.’

[source: my scan]

girl-museum:

Women’s March on Versailles
One of the most significant events in the early days of the French Revolution was when women in the marketplaces of Paris rioted over the high price and scarcity of bread on October 5, 1789.  The women’s protest quickly drew crowds of other revolutionaries seeking liberal political reforms and a constitutional monarchy in France.  Allied together, the groups grew into a mob of thousands and ransacked Paris before marching to the Palace of Versailles.  The crowd stormed the Palace in a violent clash and successfully compelled the king, his family, and most of the French Assembly to return with them to Paris.  These women effectively ended the independent authority of the king and began the French Revolution.
Image via Bibliotheque nationale de France

girl-museum:

Women’s March on Versailles

One of the most significant events in the early days of the French Revolution was when women in the marketplaces of Paris rioted over the high price and scarcity of bread on October 5, 1789.  The women’s protest quickly drew crowds of other revolutionaries seeking liberal political reforms and a constitutional monarchy in France.  Allied together, the groups grew into a mob of thousands and ransacked Paris before marching to the Palace of Versailles.  The crowd stormed the Palace in a violent clash and successfully compelled the king, his family, and most of the French Assembly to return with them to Paris.  These women effectively ended the independent authority of the king and began the French Revolution.

Image via Bibliotheque nationale de France

(via schulan)