FranzRev

Robespierre exhibited much gallantry to the ladies, and perhaps, it may be thought, sometimes carried his politeness too far.

Walking one day on the Boulevards with a lady, she very much admired a house. “Would you like to have it?” asked Robespierre. “Indeed I should,” came the reply. “Then Madame, it shall be yours,” said Robespierre, and absolutely carried his courtesy so far as to have the owner denounced as an enemy of the Republic, and immediately executed, his property confiscated, by which means Robespierre easily obtained possession of the house and presented it to the lady.

Memoirs of Madame Tussaud: Her Eventful History, ed. R.M Hailey 

Sounds legit. 

(via bunniesandbeheadings)
“This arrogant little lawyer Robespierre claims to be the voice of the people yet anyone can tell at a glance that he is too strange and disturbed to be anyone’s voice. I watched him when he came to the assembly hall on that awful day when we were imprisoned there. He spoke loudly for such a small man and people did listen to him instead of ignoring him as they did most of the other speakers. He was very peculiar, however. He kept walking back and forth on his high-heeled shoes, like a nervous woman and not a strong or forceful man. He had a nervous tic in his cheek and the muscles there kept jumping convulsively. He kept biting his nails and pulling at his clothes and smoothing his collar, and his ugly skin was full of scars and looked like the color we used to call Goose-Droppings. Altogether he made me shudder.”

The Hidden Diary of Marie Antoinette: A Novel, Carolly Erickson

This book is honest-to-god the highlight of my experience in researching the French Revolution. No book has given me so much joy. Can you believe it’s been a year since I liveblogged my reading of it? My goodness, how time flies.

(via bunniesandbeheadings)
“[Camille Desmoulins] had a stutter, but despite countless attempts to find a remedy, only one worked, which his family discovered when Camille was eleven. One of his father’s military friends visited the house and made a comment about the laziness of the poor, at which the enraged Desmoulins blurted out an eloquent tirade without a single stumble. Maybe doctors should try this with any patient who stutters, suggesting ‘Have you tried an angry speech about the monarchy?’”
— Mark Steel’s Vive La Revolution. (via ice—-queen)
ice—-queen:

"Gouvernment de Robespierre"

At least they know how neat and organized he was… I mean, look at it, they even went to the trouble of sorting heads into strict categorical piles!

ice—-queen:

"Gouvernment de Robespierre"

At least they know how neat and organized he was… I mean, look at it, they even went to the trouble of sorting heads into strict categorical piles!

“Is it true that our most dangerous enemies are the impure remnants of the race of our tyrants?…Who is going to believe that the punishment of the contemptible sister of Capet would impress our enemies more than that of Capet himself and his contemptible consort?”
— Maximilien Robespierre (via bunniesandbeheadings)

(via schulan)


Maximilien Robespierre. Engraving ca. 1810

Maximilien Robespierre. Engraving ca. 1810

(Quelle: search.ppsimages.co.jp, via bunniesandbeheadings)

jacobinisme:

Une séance au club des Jacobins en 1791 dans la bibliothèque des Dominicains. Alexandre de Lameth préside tandis que Mirabeau prononce un discours.

jacobinisme:

Une séance au club des Jacobins en 1791 dans la bibliothèque des Dominicains. Alexandre de Lameth préside tandis que Mirabeau prononce un discours.

(via montagnarde1793)

“As for myself, I abhor the death penalty administered by your laws, and for Louis I have neither love, nor hate; I hate only his crimes. I have demanded the abolition of the death penalty at your Constituent Assembly, and am not to blame if the first principles of reason appeared to you moral and political heresies. But if you will never reclaim these principles in favor of so much evil, the crimes of which belong less to you and more to the government, by what fatal error would you remember yourselves and plead for the greatest of criminals? You ask an exception to the death penalty for him alone who could legitimize it? Yes, the death penalty is in general a crime, unjustifiable by the indestructible principles of nature, except in cases protecting the safety of individuals or the society altogether. Ordinary misdemeanors have never threatened public safety because society may always protect itself by other means, making those culpable powerless to harm it. But for a king dethroned in the bosom of a revolution, which is as yet cemented only by laws; a king whose name attracts the scourge of war upon a troubled nation; neither prison, nor exile can render his existence inconsequential to public happiness; this cruel exception to the ordinary laws avowed by justice can be imputed only to the nature of his crimes. With regret I pronounce this fatal truth: Louis must die so that the nation may live.”
— Maximilien De Robespierre (via sunrec)
“Since Saturday evening I have been eating tarts non-stop. Fate has decreed that my bed should be placed within the chamber that forms the patisserie and so I was very tempted to eat all night long. Luckily I reflected that I should master these passions and finally managed to fall asleep amidst all these seductive items.”
— Maximilien Robespierre. (via osgood-schlatter)
“The republic has no worse enemies,’ [Danton] declared with passion to the Riding School, ‘than those who refuse to grasp that if Paris were to perish there would be no liberty in all the land. For there can be no liberty where there is no centre of enlightenment that draws on the lights of all our regions.’ No, to hate Paris was to subvert the Revolution.”
— Danton, by David Lawday (via davelalondes)