FranzRev

“Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”
— Voltaire (via jesylovely)
Certains médailles - bicentenaire de la révolution Française.

(Quelle: ebay.fr, via trahisonprisonetguillotine)

“What is the Third Estate? Everything. What has it been up to now in the political order? Nothing. What does it demand? To become something.”
— Abbe Sieyes (via aiviloharas)
vivelareine:

The October 6 march on Versailles, illustrated by Rolf Rettich for ‘Maria Theresa: One Heart and Many Crowns.’
[source: my scan]

vivelareine:

The October 6 march on Versailles, illustrated by Rolf Rettich for ‘Maria Theresa: One Heart and Many Crowns.’

[source: my scan]

girl-museum:

Women’s March on Versailles
One of the most significant events in the early days of the French Revolution was when women in the marketplaces of Paris rioted over the high price and scarcity of bread on October 5, 1789.  The women’s protest quickly drew crowds of other revolutionaries seeking liberal political reforms and a constitutional monarchy in France.  Allied together, the groups grew into a mob of thousands and ransacked Paris before marching to the Palace of Versailles.  The crowd stormed the Palace in a violent clash and successfully compelled the king, his family, and most of the French Assembly to return with them to Paris.  These women effectively ended the independent authority of the king and began the French Revolution.
Image via Bibliotheque nationale de France

girl-museum:

Women’s March on Versailles

One of the most significant events in the early days of the French Revolution was when women in the marketplaces of Paris rioted over the high price and scarcity of bread on October 5, 1789.  The women’s protest quickly drew crowds of other revolutionaries seeking liberal political reforms and a constitutional monarchy in France.  Allied together, the groups grew into a mob of thousands and ransacked Paris before marching to the Palace of Versailles.  The crowd stormed the Palace in a violent clash and successfully compelled the king, his family, and most of the French Assembly to return with them to Paris.  These women effectively ended the independent authority of the king and began the French Revolution.

Image via Bibliotheque nationale de France

(via schulan)

“« La devise des femmes est travailler, obéir et se taire, écrit ainsi M.B. dans son « Cahier de doléances et réclamations des femmes », en 1789. « Voilà certes un système digne de ces siècles d’ignorance, où les plus forts ont fait les lois et soumis les plus faibles. »”
"Nous aussi des citoyennes". Les femmes dans la Révolution française de 1789 (via apocalypse-revolutionnaire)

(via bunniesandbeheadings)

sonuccellonero:

Les femmes marchent à ​​Versailles 5 et 6 Octobre, 1789.

!pain!

villorceau:

~Original~ decree of the National Convention dated 5th September 1793. This sets out some details relating to the Committee of Public Safety Sectional Committees of Public Safety in Paris: first of all, who may be a member (no members of the former nobility and no unmarried priests), and then what each member is to be paid (three livres per day, the money to come from a special levy on les riches). Printed in Paris, and the typesetting is somewhat irregular, as can be seen. Scans once again my own.

greluc:

The September Massacres were a wave of killings in Paris (2–7 September 1792) and other cities in late summer 1792, during the French Revolution.
There is a close relationship between the refusal to swear to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the September Massacres. The honor of the faithful priests could not be corrupted by the threat of being killed. The revolutionary factions, irritated, had decided to do away with the leaders of that resistance. Between August 11 to 30 of 1792, more than 250 priests were imprisoned in various prisons of Paris – some in Carmel, others in La Force, others in Saint Firmin.
Among the prisoners were three Prelates, the superior general of the Marists, the superior of the Eudists, the general secretary of the Christian Brothers, parish priests, Benedictines, Jesuits, Franciscans, Capuchins, Sulpicians and others. God wanted all the classes of secular and regular clergy to be represented on the coming day of supreme testimony.
These men were not conspirators, they had not betrayed their country. They had simply refused to swear to a Civil Constitution of the Clergy that called for them to accept the principles of the French Revolution. For a priest to sign that Constitution was tantamount to delivering the Church to the State. Their consciences could not permit them to do this. And thus they preferred to die, concurring with the courageous words of the Bishop of Sens: “If God permits us to perish for so beautiful a cause, we should rejoice. This means that we were judged worthy to suffer for Him!”
On the afternoon of September 2, the revolutionary mobs broke into those prisons shouting to the priests: “Take the oath!” When they refused, they massacred them with blows from guns and swords. Most of the bodies were transported to the cemetery of Vaugirard, where large pits had been prepared the day before. Some of the bodies were thrown in a well of the Carmelite Monastery. Later, searches were made, and a large number of skulls and bones were found showing the marks of the blows they had received, as can be verified in the crypt of the Church of Carmel in Paris where they are kept.
The September martyrs were not forgotten after the Terror. In 1798 Pius VI gave them the name “choir of martyrs.” On October 17, 1926, Pope Pius XI beatified 191 of them.
Bio via traditioninaction.org

greluc:

The September Massacres were a wave of killings in Paris (2–7 September 1792) and other cities in late summer 1792, during the French Revolution.

There is a close relationship between the refusal to swear to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy and the September Massacres. The honor of the faithful priests could not be corrupted by the threat of being killed. The revolutionary factions, irritated, had decided to do away with the leaders of that resistance. Between August 11 to 30 of 1792, more than 250 priests were imprisoned in various prisons of Paris – some in Carmel, others in La Force, others in Saint Firmin.

Among the prisoners were three Prelates, the superior general of the Marists, the superior of the Eudists, the general secretary of the Christian Brothers, parish priests, Benedictines, Jesuits, Franciscans, Capuchins, Sulpicians and others. God wanted all the classes of secular and regular clergy to be represented on the coming day of supreme testimony.

These men were not conspirators, they had not betrayed their country. They had simply refused to swear to a Civil Constitution of the Clergy that called for them to accept the principles of the French Revolution. For a priest to sign that Constitution was tantamount to delivering the Church to the State. Their consciences could not permit them to do this. And thus they preferred to die, concurring with the courageous words of the Bishop of Sens: “If God permits us to perish for so beautiful a cause, we should rejoice. This means that we were judged worthy to suffer for Him!”

On the afternoon of September 2, the revolutionary mobs broke into those prisons shouting to the priests: “Take the oath!” When they refused, they massacred them with blows from guns and swords. Most of the bodies were transported to the cemetery of Vaugirard, where large pits had been prepared the day before. Some of the bodies were thrown in a well of the Carmelite Monastery. Later, searches were made, and a large number of skulls and bones were found showing the marks of the blows they had received, as can be verified in the crypt of the Church of Carmel in Paris where they are kept.

The September martyrs were not forgotten after the Terror. In 1798 Pius VI gave them the name “choir of martyrs.” On October 17, 1926, Pope Pius XI beatified 191 of them.

Bio via traditioninaction.org

(via schulan)